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The Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union (AU), at its 463rd meeting held on 27 October 2014, in an open session, in accordance with Article 8 (10) of the PSC Protocol, on the theme: “Structural Prevention of Conflict – Reinvigorating States in Fragile Situations in Africa”, adopted the following decision:

Council,

1. Takes note of the Concept Note PSC/PR/2.(CDLXIII) on the theme “Structural Prevention of Conflict: Reinvigorating States in Fragile Situations in Africa” prepared by the Commission, as well as of the statements made by AU Member States, bilateral and multilateral partners and civil society organisations;

2. Recalls the “Solemn Declaration on the 50th Anniversary of the Organization of African Unity (OAU)/AU”, adopted by the Assembly of the Union, in Addis Ababa, on 25 May 2013, on the occasion of the Union’s Golden Jubilee [Assembly/AU/Decl.3(XXI)], in which the Heads of State and Government pledged not to bequeath the burden of conflict to the next generation of Africans, setting as an objective the elimination of all conflicts by 2020; expressed their determination to anchor African societies, Governments and institutions on respect for the rule of law, human rights and dignity, popular participation, the management of diversity, as well as inclusion and democracy; and committed themselves to place the African people at the centre of the Union’s endeavours and to eradicate poverty;

3. Further recalls its earlier communiqués and press statements relating to the structural prevention of conflicts, including Press Statement PSC/PR/BR/(CCLXXIV) on “the World Development Report (WDR) 2011 – Conflict Security and Development”, adopted at its 274th meeting held on 25 April 2011; Declaration PSC/MIN/BR.1(CCLXXV) on “The State of Peace and Security in Africa”, adopted at its 275th meeting held on 26 April 2011; communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.(CCCLX) on “The full use of all available tools in preventive diplomacy”, adopted at its 360th meeting held on 22 March 2013; and Press Statement PSC/PR/BR.(CDXXX) on “Silencing the Guns: Pre-requisites for Realizing a Conflict-Free Africa by the Year 2020”, adopted at its 430th meeting held on 24 April 2014;

4. Also recalls decision Assembly/AU/Dec.512(XXII) adopted by the 22nd Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, from 26 to 27 June 2014, endorsing the Report of the High-Level Panel on Fragile States titled “Ending Conflict and Building Peace in Africa: A Call to Action”. In this respect, Council notes that for the High-Level Panel, fragility is not a category of states, but a risk inherent in the development process itself and that, in the coming period, it will appear across Africa in different places and forms, at national or local level – including in countries not currently classified as fragile. Council further notes that for the High-Level Panel, fragility is linked to rapid urbanization, youth unemployment, inequality and social exclusion, new natural resource finds, climate change, state building and peace building processes, which have the potential to put unbearable strain on national institutions, creating a risk of violence;


5. Reiterates its conviction that situations of marginalization, abuse of human rights, refusal to accept electoral defeat, manipulation of constitutions, mismanagement and unequal distribution of resources, lack of socio-economic opportunities, unemployment, as well as corruption, among other factors, are potent triggers of violent conflicts in Africa. Accordingly, Council stresses the imperative of good governance through the strengthening of democratic culture and institutions, respect for human rights, upholding of the rule of law, as well as of socio-economic development, as a means for preventing conflicts and fostering peace and stability on the continent;

6. Recognizes that building strong, responsive and accountable state institutions at the local and national levels that deliver essential services, as well as ensure inclusive political processes, rule of law and public security, is key to preventing conflicts and consolidating peace building gains;

7. Acknowledges that, over the years, the AU has adopted several instruments on human and people’s rights, governance, elections and democracy, respect for diversity and minority rights, youth, as well as management of natural resources, which represent a consolidated framework of norms and principles, whose scrupulous observance would greatly contribute to the structural prevention of conflicts and the consolidation of peace where it has been achieved. In this respect, Council underlines once again the relevance of the Declaration on the Framework for an OAU Response to Unconstitutional Changes of Government of July 2000; the Solemn Declaration on the Conference on Security, Stability, Development and Co-operation in Africa (CSSDCA) of July 2000 and its Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) of July 2002; the AU Convention on the Prevention and Combating of Corruption of 2003; the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance of January 2007; the Declaration on the Shared Values of January 2011; the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1981) and its Protocols Relating to the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1998) and on the Rights of Women (2003); the African Youth Charter (2006); and the Action Plan for implementing the African Mining Vision on Natural Resources Management (2012);

8. Also acknowledges the establishment of mechanisms aimed at monitoring progress in governance, such as the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)-led Africa Governance Report (AGR), which provide early warning tools to anticipate the occurrence of governance-related conflicts, as well as the progress made towards the operationalization of the Continental Early Warning System (CEWS) at the level of both the AU and the Regional Economic Communities (RECs). Council stresses that the effective use of the existing instruments/mechanisms would considerably reduce the risk of conflicts and violence on the continent, while improving the living conditions of the African people;

9. Expresses the conviction that focus for the AU should no longer be on the adoption of additional instruments, unless exceptional circumstances so require, but rather the implementation of the existing ones. In this respect, Council calls for renewed efforts from all concerned to address implementation gaps, enhance compliance and live up to the expectations for better governance arising from the commitments made by the Member States, and underscores the importance of effective leadership in building and maintaining institutions of good governance. More specifically, Council underlines the need for:

(i) the establishment and strengthening of responsive, accountable and strong institutions at the local, national, regional and continental levels;

(ii) the acceleration of the signature, ratification and domestication of relevant AU instruments, as well as implementation of sustained sensitization and popularization activities – in this respect, Council appeals to Member States that have not yet done so to urgently take the necessary steps to become parties to these instruments;

(iii) the enhancement of compliance with the existing instruments. In this respect, Council underscores the important contribution expected from the Commission in monitoring and encouraging implementation;

(iv) the effective use of existing mechanisms and instruments such as the APRM and the AGR, in order to better monitor and improve the quality of governance in Africa;

(v) greater involvement of the AU Panel of the Wise (PoW), the Pan-African Parliament and the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights in the overall efforts to promote good governance and prevent conflicts, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the PSC Protocol; and

(vi) the implementation, wherever required, of security sector reform programs, on the basis of the AU Policy Framework on Security Sector Reform and other relevant instruments;

10. Commends the Commission for its ongoing efforts to finalize the elaboration of a Continental Structural Conflict Prevention Framework (CSCPF), following the meeting it convened in Kigali, Rwanda, from 14 to 16 June 2013, as a tool to facilitate a Commission-wide and coordinated approach to structural prevention, and requests that this process be expedited. Council further commends the ongoing efforts by the Commission to develop a Structural Vulnerability Assessment (SVA) tool to facilitate the identification of a country’s structural vulnerability to conflict at an early stage, with special emphasis on areas that are relevant in identifying drivers of violent conflict: (i) socio-economic development; (ii) good governance, rule of law, democracy and human rights; (iii) security sector; (iv) environment and climate change; (v) gender and youth; (vi) post-conflict peace-building and (vii) transitional justice and reconciliation. Council encourages the Commission to expedite the completion of the SVA process, with a view to availing this tool to Member States as part of national efforts to prevent conflict and sustain peace and stability. Council looks forward to the submission by the Commission of a report on steps taken to finalize both the CSCPF and the SVA, for its approval;

11. Urges Member States to establish national peace infrastructure, including early warning systems, to support efforts at conflict prevention at local and national levels. Council requests the Commission, in close collaboration with the RECs, to extend the necessary technical assistance to Member States in this respect, including the setting up of Situation Rooms that bring together all stakeholders to facilitate the gathering of the information required for early action by decision-makers;

12. Calls for renewed efforts towards the implementation of the AU Policy Framework for Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development (PCRD), adopted by the 9th Ordinary Session of the Executive Council held in Banjul, The Gambia, from 25 to 29 June 2006 [EX.CL/Dec.302(IX)], in order to enable countries emerging from conflict to more effectively address the challenges facing them. In this respect, Council underlines the critical importance of the African Solidarity Initiative (ASI), launched on 13 July 2012, as a tool to mobilize, from within the continent, support for African countries emerging from conflict, as well as consolidate and expand intra-African cooperation and mutual assistance, in line with the PCRD Policy Framework, as well as the 1975 Inter-African Convention Establishing an African Technical Cooperation Programme. Council, in line with decision Assembly/AU/Dec.425 (XIX) on the ASI, adopted by the 19th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, held in Addis Ababa from 15 to 16 July 2012, encourages the Commission in collaboration with the Member States, the RECs and other relevant African institutions, to intensify its efforts aimed at mobilizing in kind and capacity building support, as well as financial contributions, to support post-conflict reconstruction and development activities in the countries emerging from conflict;

13. Calls on the private sector entrepreneurs and philanthropists to channel more investments for job creation and income generating activities in countries in fragile situations in Africa and those emerging from conflicts;

14. Expresses full support to the recommendations contained in the report of the High-Level Panel on Fragile States, and calls for sustained efforts by Member States to:

(i) manage change and address major challenges likely to exert added pressure on national institutions, including youth unemployment, urbanization, management and discovery of natural resources, climate disruption and poverty and inequality; and

(ii) create resilient states and societies able to manage the above-mentioned pressures, drawing on the resilience found in African societies, including the capacity and contribution of the private sector, civil society and communities, and women, as well as on AU’s instruments addressing the drivers of conflicts;

15. Requests the Commission, working closely with the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the UNECA, and with the support of relevant international partners, to actively work towards the implementation of the recommendations contained in the report of the High-Level Panel on Fragile States;

16. Decides, within the framework of the relevant provisions of communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.(CCCLX), to:

(a) hold an annual comprehensive review of the state of peace and security on the continent, using horizon scanning approaches, on the basis of updates provided by the CEWS, relevant AU institutions, such as the PoW, African think tanks, African civil society organizations and other stakeholders;

(b) fully operationalize the 2009 Livingstone Formula and Maseru Conclusions on the interaction with civil society by holding a meeting with civil society organizations every year, in December; and

(c) convene an annual meeting with all relevant stakeholders, including the Pan-African Parliament and the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights, to more effectively follow-up, within the framework of its conflict prevention responsibilities, the progress made towards the promotion of democratic practices, good governance, the rule of law, protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for the sanctity of human life and international humantarian law by Member States, as provided for in Article 7 (m) of the PSC Protocol;

17. Looks forward to the submission by the Commission to the Assembly of the Union, through the Executive Council, of a Roadmap on the actions necessary for the attainment of the goal of a conflict-free Africa by 2020, it being understood that such Roadmap should also include practical steps for the implementation of paragraph 17 of Decision Assembly/AU/Dec.501(XXII), which declared 2014 – 2024 as the Madiba Nelson Mandela Decade for Reconciliation in Africa;

18. Requests the Chairperson of the Commission to submit regular reports, at least once a year, on the follow-up to, and implementation of, the present communiqué;

19. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

                                      “STRUCTURAL PREVENTION OF CONFLICT:
                                       REINVIGORATING STATES IN FRAGILE SITUATIONS”

                                                                     CONCEPT NOTE



I.    INTRODUCTION

1.    The present Concept Note is submitted to facilitate Council’s deliberations at its open session on the theme “Structural Prevention of Conflict: Reinvigorating States in Fragile Situations”. It provides a brief overview of the peace and security challenges facing the continent and the existing African Union (AU) instruments and tools to address situations of fragility through the structural prevention of conflicts. It identifies a set of questions that could be discussed during the open session, and concludes with a summary of the expected outcome.

II.    BACKGROUND

2.    Over the past years, the AU and the Regional Economic Communities/Regional Mechanisms for Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution (RECs/RMs) have made great strides towards operationalizing the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA).  Tangible progress has also been recorded in the resolution of conflicts in Africa, bringing about hope and increasing the prospects for renewal and development, which now need to be enhanced through sustained efforts at peace-building and post-conflict reconstruction.

3.    However, conflict, insecurity and instability continue to prevail in some parts of the continent, with their attendant humanitarian consequences and socio-economic impact. At the same time, the nature of conflict has changed: transnational dynamics, non-state actor violence and other related emerging security threats play an ever-increasing role. The relevant AU policy organs have, on a number of occasions, expressed concern at this situation. In particular, the 360th meeting of Council held on 22 March 2013 noted that, “while the number of violent conflicts in the continent has been significantly reduced and important advances have been made, thanks to Africa’s determination and collective efforts, with the support of its partners, a number of African countries remain trapped in a vicious cycle of conflict, linked to multiple factors, including governance deficit” [Communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.CCCLX)]. The 21st Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, held in Addis Ababa from 26 to 27 May 2013, made a similar pronouncement, noting, in addition to the prevalence of conflict in some parts of the continent, the frequent recourse to armed rebellion to further political claims, the threats posed by terrorism and hostage taking, illicit proliferation of arms, transnational organized crime, drug trafficking, piracy, and illicit exploitation of natural resources to fuel conflicts [Assembly/AU/Decl.1(XXI) on the Report of Peace and Security Council in its Activities and the State of Peace and Security in Africa].

4.    The need for renewed efforts to address the scourge of conflicts in Africa was underlined in the “Solemn Declaration on the 50th Anniversary of the OAU/AU”, adopted by the Assembly of the Union, in Addis Ababa, on 25 May 2013, on the occasion of the Union’s Golden Jubilee [Assembly/AU/Decl.3(XXI)]. The Assembly pledged not to bequeath the burden of conflict to the next generation of Africans, setting as an objective the elimination of all conflicts by 2020, within the framework of “Agenda 2063 - The Africa We Want”. The Assembly expressed its determination to anchor African societies, Governments and institutions on respect for the rule of law, human rights and dignity, popular participation, the management of diversity, as well as inclusion and democracy.  It also committed itself to place the African people, in particular women, children and the youth, as well as persons with disabilities, at the centre of the Union’s endeavours, and to eradicate poverty.

5.    At its 430th meeting held on 24 April 2014, on the theme “Silencing the Guns: Pre-requisites for Realizing a Conflict-Free Africa by the Year 2020” [Press Statement PSC/PR/BR.(CDXXX)], Council agreed on the urgent need for the elaboration of a roadmap, to be submitted to the Assembly of the Union, towards achieving the set objectives. As a follow-up, the Commission convened in Durban, South Africa, from 28 to 29 April 2014, a High-Level Retreat, which sketched the constitutive elements of a Draft Roadmap for “Silencing the Guns: Building a Roadmap to a Conflict-Free Continent”, with the aim to addressing the drivers of conflict in Africa – such as poverty and the inequitable distribution of resources and wealth, poor governance, social, political and ethic exclusion.

III.    STATES IN FRAGILE SITUATIONS AND STRUCTURAL CONFLICT PREVENTION

6.    The African continent is faced with situations of structural vulnerability that have the potential to escalate into violent conflict. These situations of actual or potential violent conflict have been described in different terms and attributed to a variety of underlying reasons. In public and political debate, both in Africa and abroad, reference is often indiscriminately made to attributes such as “fragility”, “instability”, “state collapse”, “state inversion”, “state decline”, “state decay”, “state failure”, “weak states”, “quasi states”, “degrees of statelessness”.

7.    The Report of the High-Level Panel on Fragile States titled “Ending Conflict and Building Peace in Africa: A Call to Action” discussed in-depth the issue of fragility. The Report was presented to, and endorsed by, the 22nd Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, from 26 to 27 June 2014 [Assembly/AU/Dec.512(XXII)].

8.     The Report “sees fragility not as a category of states, but as a risk inherent in the development process itself”, adding that, “in the coming period, it will appear across Africa in different places and forms, at national or local level – including in countries not currently classified as fragile”. The Report notes that fragility in Africa is linked to rapid urbanization, youth unemployment, inequality and social exclusion, new natural resource finds, climate change, statebuilding and peacebuilding processes, which have the potential to put unbearable strain on national institutions, creating a risk of violence. The Panel’s recommendations to address conflict and fragility in Africa revolve around two main axes: on the one hand, mounting an effective policy response to the most disruptive economic, social and environmental changes facing Africa; on the other, creating resilient states and societies able to manage those pressures.


9.    In light of the definition provided by the High-Level Panel, preventive action therefore, involves direct and operational steps before large-scale violence occurs, as well as a strategic focus on the structural causes of conflict. In other words, preventive action is the combined application of structural and direct prevention measures in a coordinated way. While direct and structural prevention remain two distinct policy responses based on the kind of ‘causes of conflict’ they seek to address, each requires the other in order to be effective. Furthermore, direct and structural prevention approaches can be deployed at all points of the conflict cycle. Such is the AU’s approach, as articulated in relevant instruments and Council’s pronouncements.

10.    It should be recalled that conflict and violence develop in environments characterized by structural factors: history of past social violence, unstable neighbourhoods, deep seated poverty, in conjunction with societal conditions such as discrimination and economic deprivation/decline, political repression and authoritarianism, ethnic polarisation, and various environmental and resource degradation problems that may contribute to political instability and conflict. Against this backdrop, structural prevention activities should support inter alia the balancing of political, economic, social and cultural opportunities among all segments of society, contributing to the strengthening of democratic legitimacy, the effectiveness of governance institutions, peaceful conciliation of group interests and bridging of dividing lines among different segments of society. When successful, such activities should lead to sustainable economic development, good governance and respect for human rights, viable political structures with the capacity to manage change without resort to violence, and healthy environmental and social conditions.

IV.    RELEVANT AU INSTRUMENTS, POLICIES AND TOOLS

11.     Structural prevention of conflict is closely aligned with the AU’s general principles as enshrined in the Constitutive Act, which commits Member States to respect democratic principles, human rights, the rule of law and good governance, while also addressing issues relating to socio-economic development and integration. In this regard, the AU has, over the years, adopted several normative instruments designed to facilitate the structural prevention of conflicts. These instruments relate to human rights, governance and the fight against corruption, democratisation processes, socio-economic development, employment, inclusion of youth, disarmament, terrorism, and the prevention and reduction of interstate conflicts. As stressed in Communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.CCCLX, they represent a consolidated framework of commonly accepted norms and principles, whose observance would reduce considerably the risk of conflict and violence and consolidate peace where it has been achieved.

12.    Regarding more specifically issues relating to democracy, rule of law, good governance, mention should be made of the Declaration on the Framework for an OAU Response to Unconstitutional Changes of Government of July 2000; the Solemn Declaration on the Conference on Security, Stability, Development and Cooperation in Africa (CSSDCA) of July 2000 and its Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) of July 2002; the NEPAD Declaration on Democracy and the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) of July 2002; the AU Convention on the Prevention and Combating of Corruption  of 2003; the Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance of January 2007; as well as of the Declaration on the Shared Values of January 2011. Mention should also be made of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1981) and its Protocols Relating to the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1998) and on the Rights of Women (2003).

13.    These efforts are significantly reinforced by “Agenda 2063 - The Africa We Want”, which introduces a list of eight “Critical Enablers for Africa’s Transformation”. Addressing the imperative to develop the conditions for structural prevention, “Agenda 2063”, among others, highlights the need for “accountable leadership and responsive institutions”, including democratic and developmental governance, as well as the importance of building “capable and democratic developmental states and institutions”.

14.    Within the framework of the Continental Early Warning System (CEWS), and as a follow-up to Communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.CCCLX), the Commission convened a meeting in Kigali, Rwanda, in June 2013, to finalize its Conflict Prevention Framework, to facilitate a Commission-wide approach to structural prevention. As part of this effort, the Commission is developing tools aimed at facilitating the identification of a country’s structural vulnerability to conflict at an early stage, with special emphasis on the following areas that, in the past, have proven to be particularly relevant in identifying drivers of violent conflict: (i) socio-economic development; (ii) good governance, including preventing and fighting corruption, rule of law, democracy and human rights; (iii) the security sector; (iv) environment and climate change; (v) gender and youth; (vi) post-conflict peace-building, and (vii) transitional justice and reconciliation. These tools will facilitate the elaboration of appropriate strategies to further structural conflict prevention. The notion of structural stability - a situation denoting the opposite of “structural vulnerability” - is at the heart of this effort.

V.    OBJECTIVES AND ISSUES TO BE ADDRESSED

15.    The purpose of the open session is to exchange views on how best to enhance structural prevention in Africa, particularly through the identification of a country’s structural vulnerability to conflict at an early stage. In this respect, the following questions may be pertinent during the discussions:

(i)    What are the causes and manifestations of fragility and its impact on the quest for peace, security, stability and development?

(ii)    Drawing on the findings and recommendations of the High-Level Panel Report, how can we  develop effective policy response to the most disruptive economic, social and environmental changes facing Africa (rapid urbanization, youth unemployment, inequality and social exclusion, new natural resource finds, climate change, statebuilding and peacebuilding processes), and how to build resilient states and societies that have the capacity to manage such pressures, including through building interlocking institutions and partnerships at the community, state and regional levels?

(iii)    What strategies can best expedite the signature, ratification and domestication, as well as implementation, of AU instruments relating to human rights, governance and the fight against corruption, democratisation processes, disarmament, terrorism and the prevention and reduction of interstate conflicts, given that their observance would reduce considerably the risk of conflict and violence and consolidate peace where it has been achieved?

(iv)    How can we  better popularize relevant existing AU instruments and the provisions contained therein, for them to be owned by all stakeholders, including civil society? How can we  ensure an effective use of existing mechanisms and instruments for improving and monitoring the quality of governance in Africa, such as the APRM? How to ensure enhanced compliance with these instruments, with particular regard to the role that the AU and its relevant institutions could play in monitoring implementation, including through the development of a compliance index that can leverage Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) and would provide regular updates on the steps taken by Member States in fulfillment of their commitments?

(v)    How could Council more effectively exercise its responsibilities towards the structural prevention of conflict, including through adequate follow-up to the steps identified in Communiqué PSC/PR/COMM.CCCLX) and Press Statement PR/BR/CDXXX, notably: (a) periodic review by Council, at least once every six months, of the state of peace and security on the continent, using horizon scanning approaches, on the basis of updates provided by the CEWS, relevant AU institutions, such as the Panel of the Wise, African and international think tanks, civil society organizations and other stakeholders; (b) full operationalization of the 2009 Livingstone Formula and the Maseru Conclusions on the interaction with civil society; (c) effective follow?up by Council, within the framework of its conflict prevention responsibilities, of the progress towards the promotion of democratic practices, good governance, the rule of law, protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for the sanctity of human life and international humanitarian law by Member States, as provided for in Article 7 (m) of the PSC Protocol; and (d) convening of bi?annual meetings on preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention, within the context of Council’s mandate and processes?

(vi)    How can we  ensure greater involvement of the AU Panel of the Wise, the Pan-African Parliament and the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights in the overall efforts to promote good governance and prevent conflicts, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Protocol Relating to the Establishment of the Peace and Security Council?

(vii)    How can we reinforce AU response options to situations of structural vulnerability, including through better integration between APSA and the African Governance Agenda (AGA), the full implementation of the CEWS, preventive diplomacy, mediation and conflict resolution, coherence between the AU and the RECs/RMs in the development of APSA and funding of peace and security initiatives?

(viii)    How can we ensure a more effective implementation of the continental and regional policies on socio-economic development,employment, poverty alleviation and other related issues and better link them to the efforts being made in the area of peace and security, as part of a comprehensive and holistic approach to situations of fragility?


VI.    EXPECTED OUTCOME

16.    The session is expected to contribute to a greater awareness of the challenges linked to the issue of fragility; to inject new momentum into the efforts aimed at ensuring a more effective implementation of the relevant AU instruments, policies and programmes on peace, security and socio-economic development, as well as a more effective use of the existing mechanisms; and to facilitate a comprehensive AU‘s approach to situations of fragility, drawing from the reccommendations contained in the Report of the High-Level Panel on Fragile States, as endorsed by the Assembly of the Union in Malabo. The session is also expected to result in concrete steps that will facilitate the discharge by the Council of the mandate entrusted to it in the area of structural conflict prevention.

VII.    PARTICIPANTS

17.    The session will be held at the ambassadorial level, and will be open to the other AU Member States, representatives of bilateral and multilateral partners, think-tanks academicians, civil society organizations and other relevant stakeholders. The session will be interactive in nature and participants are encouraged to be frank, objective and innovative in their thinking.

VIII.    DATE AND VENUE

18.    The open session will be held on 27 October 2014, at 10:00 a.m., in the Plenary Hall of the Old Conference Center of the AU Headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

IX.    LOGISTICS AND MEETING’S ARRANGEMENTS

19.    The meeting proceedings will be in Arabic, English, French and Portuguese. Interventions will be limited to a maximum of four (4) minutes per speaker.


Posted by Tchioffo Kodjo

Last updated by Abraham Kebede

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